Category Archives: law

Employment Lawyer Boulder, CO

Employment law, also known as labor law, is an area of law that focuses on the rights and duties of the employee and the employer. Employment law is designed to safeguard workers in terms of workplace safety, wages, discrimination, hours, and working conditions. While federal labor laws are in place to set a baseline of rules, state labor laws can vary. For example, the federal government requires a minimum wage of $7.25, yet many states have increased that wage, requiring employers in those states to comply.

Why would you need an Employment Lawyer?

As an employee, there could be issues in the workplace that may require legal representation from an experienced Employment Lawyer. Discrimination or harassment by the employer, unfair practices on behalf of the employer, wages withheld, unlawful termination or conduct, or unsafe working conditions are all good examples of why an employee should seek legal counsel. Other legal matters, such as employee contracts, might also warrant the need for an employment attorney.

As an employer, an employment attorney can be quite beneficial when it comes to seeking advice on making decisions in regard to the employee. Such decisions can relate to firing an employee, classification of an employee, changing or eliminating pension plans or benefits, etc. An employment attorney is also a valuable resource when it comes to reviewing employment agreements and contracts, or company handbooks and policies. If an employer finds himself the subject of a complaint or lawsuit, retaining an experienced employment attorney is highly recommended.

Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Office, LLC of Longmont, CO has been practicing law in Longmont, Boulder, Denver, and Northern Colorado for over 40 years. In addition to his Juris Doctor in Law, Mr. Bendelow holds a master’s degree in industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell University. With a broad range of business knowledge and legal expertise, Ted Bendelow understands the complexities of labor law and can offer sound legal advice or representation to employers and employees, alike. If you live in Boulder or the surrounding areas and need legal representation, give Ted Bendelow at Bendelow Law Office, LLC a call today.

Corporate Law

Corporate law, also known as corporation or company law, has a close relation to contract and commercial law. It focuses on the formation, or structure of a company, along with the operations of that company. Each state has laws in place to regulate the creation of corporations, as well as their organization and dissolution. These laws can vary from state to state. Corporations are also subject to federal laws and regulations, depending upon the industry.

Corporate lawyers are experienced in handling a wide range of legal issues that many businesses can face. From multimillion-dollar mergers to a small business start-up, corporate attorneys can advise a business on a wide-array of legal matters, including the structure of the corporation, legal rights and responsibilities of the company, its obligations, contracts, environmental law, finances, and business taxes, to name a few.

While not all business transactions will require the need for a corporate attorney, some transactions or legal matters do call for advice or counsel that only an experienced and knowledgeable corporate lawyer can offer. Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Office, LLC has been practicing law for over 46 years. Ted Bendelow has a vast knowledge of corporate law. Some areas of expertise include:

• New Business Set-Up
• Mergers and Acquisitions
• Compliance
• Business Finance
• Sales and Dissolution
• Business Litigation
• Contracts
• On-Going Legal Services

If you live in Colorado and find yourself needing the counsel of a seasoned corporate attorney, call Ted at Bendelow Law Office, LLC. Ted has worked with individuals, government agencies, HOA’s, small businesses, corporations, associations, and partnerships. Ted Bendelow’s extensive knowledge and experience in business is unmatched. From Trademarks to complex litigation, Ted Bendelow at Bendelow Law Office, LLC offers his legal expertise in Boulder, Longmont, Denver, and throughout Northern Colorado. Whether Corporate law or general counsel, Ted Bendelow is the attorney to call!

Breach of Contract

When two parties enter into a contract, they are legally bound to uphold the obligations or promises expressed in that contract. If either party fails to perform or adhere to the promises set forth, this is known as a breach of contract. A Breach of Contract attorney is usually the best option when it comes to understanding and interpreting the contractual obligations, and to provide counsel and advice in trying to settle any dispute. Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Office, LLC has been providing general counsel, to include Breach of Contract law for over 40 years.

There are different types of breaches of contracts that can occur. They include:

Minor Breach: A minor breach, also known as a partial breach, occurs when a party of the contract partially fulfills the contract but fails to meet a minor condition of that contract.
Example: A contractor completes the work stated in a contract, but is a week late doing so.

Material/Fundamental Breach: A material breach occurs when a party fails or refuses to perform what is outlined in an agreement. Such breach can result in the non-breaching party suing for damages and termination of the contract.
Example: A contractor agrees to build a 3,000 square foot addition to your business, but upon completion, there is only 2,000 square feet.

Anticipatory Breach: An anticipatory breach occurs when it becomes apparent that one party will not fulfill the terms outlined in the contract. When the aggrieved party believes that there has been an anticipatory breach, that party can sue for damages, demand terms be filled, or suspend the agreement.
Example: A service company agrees to perform work in a restaurant. The restaurant agrees to pay half of the repair expense up front to secure the job. The service company does not begin the work on the agreed date and continues to delay the repairs.

If handled correctly, many breaches of contract can be solved outside of the courtroom, saving time and money for the client. A skilled and knowledgeable Breach of Contract attorney can provide sound advice and offer mediation to facilitate constructive negotiations between the parties. Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Office, LLC understands the complexities of contract law and has provided his expertise to clients in Boulder, Longmont, Denver and throughout Northern Colorado. Give the experienced team at Bendelow Law Office a call today.

Contract Law

At one point or another, most of us have entered into some type of agreement with another party. If you have leased or purchased property, started a business partnership, or agreed on the price of home repairs or improvements, then chances are you have signed a contract to solidify the agreement made. These agreements, whether verbal or in writing (except for real estate, which must be in writing), are contracts and are legally binding, however verbal contracts can be more difficult to validate.

Contracts are written to express the responsibilities of each party entering into an agreement, and while this may seem somewhat basic, the way in which a contract is written can be quite complex. A poorly written contract can result in dispute and/or legal action, therefore, hiring a Contract Law attorney can make all the difference when it comes to contract formation and structure. Not only can a Contract Law attorney adequately assist in crafting a contract, they can offer advice on existing contracts and general counsel should a contract need enforcing.

For a contract to be legally effective, there are certain requirements that must be met. These requirements include:

Legal Purpose: The purpose of the contract must not violate any laws. For example, one cannot agree to steal a car in exchange for monetary gain.
Competent Parties: Each party entering into a contract must be of legal age and be of sound mind. In other words, those entering the agreement should be capable of doing so, while understanding what they are doing.
Offer and Acceptance: A contract is considered valid once an offer is made by one party and accepted by another. The offer must state what the “offeror” is committed to be bound to and agreed upon by the party accepting said offer, or the “offeree”.
Consideration: The concept of consideration is that each party of the contract agrees to provide something of value in exchange for the same. Without consideration, there is not binding contract.
Mutual Assent: Mutual assent is the agreeance of the two parties who are entering into a contract. Both parties agree to the terms set once all requirements are in place. Also referred to as the “meeting of the minds”.

Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Firm, LLC has over 46 years of general counsel experience to include Contract Law and Breach of Contract. He has proudly served clients in Boulder, Longmont, Denver and throughout Northern Colorado. If you need the expertise of a Contract Law attorney, call Ted Bendelow at Bendelow Law Office, LLC for a consultation.

Business Law Attorney, Colorado

Business law is an area of law that pertains to every aspect of business start-up and ownership. Business creation requires an understanding of the formation, or entity, of the company and the correct filing of the necessary documents with state and local agencies to establish the new business. Once the business is established, the functions of business law include the governance of the company regarding public interaction, tax laws, employee rights, mergers and acquisitions, and business dissolution, to name a few.

Acquiring a business attorney who understands the complexities of business law can make all the difference when it comes to starting and maintaining a business. Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Office LLC has practiced law for over 46 years and offers his services in Denver, Boulder, Longmont and throughout northern Colorado.

Some areas of business law that Bendelow Law Office LLC specialize include:

  • New Business Start-Up: After careful analysis and discussion, Bendelow Law Office, LLC will help you determine the best entity for your business. Once the business formation is determined, Bendelow Law Office, LLC will prepare and file the required documents to establish your new company.
  • Business Ownership: For established businesses, Bendelow Law Office, LLC will provide general counsel for various legal needs to include employee benefits and agreements, wage administration, debt collection, and business litigation, as well as other areas of legal counsel that pertain to business law.
  • Compliance Program: Bendelow Law Office LLC will continuously work with your corporation or limited liability company through their compliance program that is offered. This program is designed to assist business owners with proper documentation of the business’s innerworkings.
  • Mergers and Acquisitions: Businesses tend to change. With that said, we can assist you throughout the changes. We offer legal assistance with restructuring, growth, mergers and acquisitions of other companies, and the sale of your business. Should you choose to dissolve a business, our legal team will work with you throughout the process.

These are just a few areas of business law that Bendelow Law Office LLC practice. If you live in Colorado and seek a business attorney, Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Firm LLC has the knowledge and expertise in business law to offer trusted, professional legal counsel. Call the experienced team at Bendelow Law Firm LLC for a consultation today.

Water Rights Attorney in Colorado

When it comes to water rights in Colorado, it can be difficult to understand the complex nature in which such rights are regulated by Colorado’s laws. While water rights vary from state to state, Colorado controls the allocation of water based on the prior appropriation system. This system determines who uses the water, when the water is used, and various uses allowed. This governed system is also known as the priority system, or “first in time, first in right”. In other words, the first person to take water and put it to beneficial use has first water rights to that water system. Keep in mind, Colorado’s appropriation system is much more complicated than appears, which is why it is important to use a water rights attorney. Ted Bendelow at Bendelow Law Offices, LLC has been offering general counsel in Colorado, to include water rights, for over 38 years.

Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Offices, LLC provides legal counsel in most aspects of water rights laws. Some of his services include:

• Protection of existing water rights
• Investigation of water rights
• Negotiation and drafting of contracts
• All phases of water rights litigation, to include representation in the courts
• Water rights involved in real estate transactions
• State and local issues pertaining to water rights

To manage water rights in Colorado, the use of legal counsel is highly recommended. An experienced attorney will help to navigate through the complex legal process and provide a better understanding of water rights laws in Colorado. Ted Bendelow of Bendelow Law Offices, LLC has the knowledge and expertise pertaining to Colorado’s water rights. Ted Bendelow and his team of experts offers legal counsel to ranchers, farmers, homeowners, lenders, land developers, and real estate brokers.

The most common individual questions involve learning about water rights in general and the their situation. I have represented various ditch companies for years and and general counsel work is most common, with little involvement in water rights or water court. In both casesability to address clients concerns is most crucial.

Whether a government agency, business owner, or private citizen, if you are seeking the representation of a water rights attorney in Colorado, call the experienced legal team at Bendelow Law Office, LLC.

Starting a New Business

Starting a new business is actually quite simple: get an employer identification number (EIN) from the Internal Revenue Service. In some industries you also need to get a business license, for example for sales tax purposes. Some businesses have further licensure obligation(s), with some licensure state required (realtor) and some locally required (Contractor).

You don’t need to form a corporation or do anything else. You are in business!

Is this a wise approach: no. There are several other steps a prudent business follows:

  1. Get a bookkeeper or accountant to set up a chart of accounts;
  2. Determine the business form you want to be: a sole proprietor; a partnership; a C Corporation; an S Corporation; an LLC; or some combination.
  3. Prepare the necessary paperwork to create the entity. This will involve addressing a variety of issues depending on the type of business (e.g. Manufacturing vs. retail), the market (local, national, international); the number of owners (one, many); the capital requirements and contributions; buy-sell restrictions, etc.
  4. Determine the name of your business. This has two reasons: (a) branding, your image is reflected by the name your use. It is generally the name forever so a lot of thought should go into the decision; (b) availability, folks commonly come up with a great name, only to find someone is already using it. There are several ways to determine availability. The first is the Colorado Secretary of State website. Search for the name you want and see if it is available. As a side note, the Secretary of State has a lot of useful information. A national search is also available for out of state use.

There is a very common misconception by owners: if they form a corporation or LLC, their personal assets will be protected in the event the entity and they are sued.

That position is only partially correct. In a breach of contract matter, the entity generally does protect the individual. However, that is NOT true in the case of tort (e.g. Personal injury). The owner can be personally liable if it is shown he/she was negligent.

So, if you are considering forming a business, we can help in determining what approach is appropriate and help forming and answering the myriad of questions which arise.

OIL AND GAS

Opportunity

Many folks have benefited from the expansion of oil and gas exploration and development in Northern Colorado. There are several elements to this opportunity that need to be understood.

Mineral Interests

Ownership of land does not necessarily mean the landowner owns all the subsurface rights. A determination of the subsurface or mineral interests must be made. It is very common for a prior owner to reserve (retain) the mineral interests or some portion when the property was sold. Those interests remain and can be through several or more ownerships ago. Thus, the first things to be determined is the mineral interests that are available to the current owner. This is always done by the Oil and Gas company when they are interested in a particular property.

The Landowner should conduct their own investigation through the title insurance policy they received when they bought the property. It will reveal the existence of any mineral interest which were reserved and not conveyed by a prior owner.

Royalties or Sale

Once it is determined the owner has mineral interests, the negotiations commonly begin with an oil and gas company. The more showing of interest by an Oil and Gas Company or “flippers” (Companies that buy the interest then later sell it, with no interest in actually drilling), suggests there is oil and gas activity in the area. Depending on the activity, there can be multiple solicitations from a variety of companies seeking to acquire the mineral interests.

The interest can take two forms: royalties or sale. Royalty commonly consist of an upfront number and a percentage of drilling income. The actual amount is very negotiable, and owners should consult with neighbors/nearby landowners and others to learn the current royalties.

A more common practice is for an oil and gas company (not necessarily the drilling company) to purchase the owners oil and gas interests. This in turn has two variations: certain land owners have royalty interests. Oil and gas companies purchase the royalty interest from the owner and in turn then receive the royalty payment from the drilling oil and gas company. This is very common, and the mineral interest purchase price can vary as much as $500-20,000 per acre.

Some folk really like this approach because they can get a large upfront payment, rather than a payment (although potentially larger) over time. Obviously, the oil and gas companies believe they will receive a greater return over time, hence their interest.

Another situation is when there is no royalty agreement and no drilling activity in the area. This presents more of a risk to the oil and gas companies or flippers, and the price are generally lower.

A variance on the royalty/sale scenario is a partial sale, whereby the owner retains a portion of the royalties and sells a portion. Some risk (royalties), but some certainty (partial sale).

Price is the major unknown in these negotiations. “Shopping the deal” is an opportunity, given the enormous amount of drilling activity in the area. Drilling companies don’t want other companies to know what they are paying, but prices have become common knowledge.

We can help folks through this minefield hopefully to benefit from opportunities that have only really appeared in the last 5-10 years.

Longmont Attorney Ted Bendelow General Counsel

General Counsel.  I get asked all the time, what does that mean?  I describe it as a cross between traffic cop, family physician and paramedic.  I represented a major auto racing organization, with 50,000 members, for 25 years.  I have represented a motorcycle racing organization with 5,000 members for over 20 years, since its formation.  I represent a Korean high tech company in its US operations.  I have represented a variety of construction companies, small manufacturers, limited liability companies and sole proprietors.  In short, pretty much every type of entity.

What do I do?  You name it.  From contract to complex litigation.  From insurance coverage to trademarks (one client owned over 50 registered trademarks).  I have litigated cases in Florida, New York, Texas, Minnesota, California and Colorado.  I have handled negotiations that went on for days with some of the major figures in American industry.  I have been involved in deals in the beginning, in the middle when I took over from someone else or, too commonly, at the end when problems have arisen and there is panic in the air.  What do we do!?

But, that’s the fun and the challenge.  Identify the problem, find a solution.  Generally negotiations work but the variety of courts listed suggests, not always.  Sometimes the “traffic cop” requires finding a varieties of experts or attorney specialists and pointing them in the right direction; monitoring their efforts and their billings but hopefully not “herding cats”, though sometimes it feels like that.

Business Law-Intellectual Property

The last blog talked about Patents and Trademarks. Before we move on, another comment about Trademarks. The Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) has an extensive web site that allows the filing of a Trademark Application on line. Before going through the process (which is somewhat self-explanatory), I urge folks to find out if the proposed name to be trademarked is actually available.

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There are two companies: Thompson and Thompson, and Corsearch, which will conduct a national search to find out whether there are other uses of the proposed name. Please understand that actual use is the strongest trademark and you may trademark a name, only to find that it is already being used somewhere, thereby minimizing if not defeating your trademark.
Also, the ability to trademark and the strength of the trademark depends heavily on the “strength” of the name: is it unique, generic, merely descriptive, fanciful? Has it acquired secondary meaning? What does the name identify-product, category? The word “Apple” cannot be trademark to name a fruit, but it can be used to identify a computer. It is a common name used in an uncommon way. There are many “tricks” to trademarking, so before you go online to file an application, and spend the non-refundable fees, it is a good idea to better understand the world of trademarks. We will move on the Copyrights, the Right of Publicity and Tradenames, next time.